House GOP wants to change House rules to make it easier for constituents to vote in 2018

The House GOP is seeking to change rules for the 2018 midterm elections that allow constituents to directly vote on the candidates they back.

The House Rules Committee voted Thursday to pass an amendment that would give House members direct access to constituents’ email addresses and other personal information in their districts.

The amendment is a response to a lawsuit by a former member of Congress, who claimed that she could not use her district’s email system to get information about the candidates she supported.

The measure would require that all House members provide the information directly to the voter in a “legislative record” that the House sends to their home districts.

House Republicans also want to require that candidates be certified by a federal entity in order to run for a seat.

The rule change would affect all candidates who have a chance to win a House seat in 2018, including incumbents who are retiring.

The legislation was introduced by Rep. John Lewis, D-Ga., who served as the longest-serving civil rights leader in the history of the United States.

Lewis, who was born in Atlanta, Georgia, said the legislation is important because it would help prevent voters from being disenfranchised from voting.

“This is a momentous moment, and this is not just a political fight,” Lewis said in a statement.

“The people who elected me are in the process of giving the American people a voice in shaping their future.

We have a responsibility to ensure that our representatives have the confidence to serve them and our country.”

In his letter to the Committee, Lewis said he is concerned about the lack of oversight of elections, particularly the 2016 elections in which Hillary Clinton, the former secretary of state, beat President Donald Trump.

He said the House has a “serious problem” with voter fraud.

“I have serious concerns about the way the House of Representatives operates, and I am deeply troubled by the lack, as we know, of oversight and accountability.

The Committee needs to fix this,” he wrote.

In 2018, there are a total of 24 House seats up for election.

The Republicans control 52 seats and Democrats hold 30.

In 2016, Democrats won a majority of House seats, but the House held two midterm elections, one for House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and the other for Rep. Steny Hoyer, D, Maryland.